Resource Library

Building School Capacity Through Community Collaboration Conference - June 12, 2019 
Downloadable
 
Data Links 

Report Release: Vibrant and Healthy KidsAligning SciencePractice, and Policy to Advance Health Equity

Programs and policies designed to mitigate adverse conditions for U.S. children often fail to achieve the intended outcomes for the majority of recipients of these interventions. Read more: Vibrant and Healthy Kids: Aligning Science, Practice, and Policy to Advance Health Equity

New ICD-10 codes related to social determinants proposed

A new collaboration between the AMA and UnitedHealthcare will work to address the social and environmental factors that affect patients’ health by standardizing data collection on their social determinants of health (SDOH) to help address individuals’ unique needs that often go unmet.

The two organizations are supporting the creation of 23 new ICD-10 codes related to social determinants. ICD-10 codes are typically used to record diagnosis, symptoms and procedures. Learn more:  https://www.ama-assn.org/practice-management/digital/new-icd-10-codes-will-help-physicians-tackle-social-barriers-care

Past Meeting Presentations - March 2019

Peter Lindsey, co-chair of the Maine Children's Growth Council, provided one of the professional development sessions at our March 28th meeting. His presentation/summary of the report and the Maine Children's Growth Council 2018 Annual Report are available for viewing/download.

Making Maine Work: Critical Investments for the Maine Economy

“This Making Maine Work report is a collaboration of the Maine State Chamber of Commerce, the Maine Development Foundation, and Educate Maine. All three organizations are engaged in public-private collaborations to improve the economic health and quality of life for residents of Maine. This report is modeled on a similar Making Maine Work report from 2010, which was done in anticipation of a new administration in Augusta, as is the case again now."

Making Maine Work [on chamber website]

From Best Practices to Breakthrough Impacts

A Science-Based Approach to Building a More Promising Future for Young Children and Families from the Harvard Center on the Developing Child.

Key Findings [pdf]

Full Report [pdf]

Robert Anda in Maine

Dr. Robert Anda speaks in Maine, February 2017. Here is the video of his talk on the Implications for the Health Care System.


Health and Behavioral Outcomes of ACEs in Maine

Using data from the Maine Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System(BRFSS), researchers explore physical behavioral and mental health outcomes among adults with ACEs in Maine.

Poster Based on Research [PDF file]

HCDC report on Best Practices in working with families

The PDF of this report, titled “From Best Practices to Breakthrough Impacts – – A science-based approach to building a more promising future for young children and families,” is too large to upload here, but it can be accessed online at the Harvard Center on the Developing Child.

ACEs in Maine – One doctor responds

This article from the Waterville Sentinel in April, 2016 featured MRBN member, physician Ann Dorney

Handout – Social & Emotional Development 101

Short MCA – SEDL 101 about Social & Emotional development from the Maine Children’s Alliance, 2016.

Handout - ACEs basics with Maine stats

ACES Overview Handout from MRBN and the Maine Coalition for the Advancement of Child and Adolescent Mental Health, 2016.

Handout – ACES in Maine

This is a one-page handout focused on ACEs in Maine. Uses data from the 2011/2012 National Survey of Children’s Health. From the Maine Children’s Alliance.

Adverse Childhood Experiences in Maine II:Knowledge, Action, and Future Directions

This 2016 report is a follow up from the 2010 Maine ACEs Survey. Maine has an extensive and broad history of interest in the impact of stresses, such as Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), on child, family, and adult health and behavior outcomes. This report also discusses the impact of the Maine Resilience Building Network. Authored by Sue Mackey Andrews, Leslie Forstadt, Erik Hood, and Mark Rains, 2016.

Publication List

ACES Publications from the CDC ACE Study Web site, where you can search this list by year or health outcomes

Emotional Development Is Built into the Brain

Children’s Emotional Development Is Built into the Architecture of Their Brains

A growing body of scientific evidence demonstrates that emotional development begins early in life and is closely connected with the emergence of cognitive, language, and social skills. Early emotional development lays the foundation for later academic performance, mental health, and the capacity to form successful relationships. Despite this knowledge, most policies related to early childhood focus exclusively on cognitive development as it relates to school readiness, neglecting the importance of such capacities as the ability to regulate one’s own emotions and behavior and to manage successful interactions with other people. As a result, many of our nation’s policies, such as those that regulate child care provider training, availability of early childhood mental health services, and early identification and treatment of behavioral disorders, overlook emotional development as a focus of evaluation and intervention. This report from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child presents an overview of the scientific research on how a child’s capacity to regulate emotions develops in a complex interaction with his or her environment and ongoing cognitive, motor, and social development. It then discusses the implications of this research for policies affecting young children, their caregivers, and service providers.

Read the Report [pdf]

Exposure to Toxic Substances Impacts the Brain

Early Exposure to Toxic Substances Damages Brain Architecture

New science shows that exposure to toxins prenatally or early in life can have a devastating and lifelong effect on the developing architecture of the brain. Exposures to many chemicals have much more severe consequences for embryos, fetuses, and young children, whose brains are still developing, than for adults. Substances that can have a truly poisonous effect on the brain—known as neurotoxins—can be found in environmental chemicals such as lead and mercury, in recreational drugs such as alcohol, nicotine, and cocaine, and in prescription medications, such as some acne treatments. Most neurotoxin exposure is preventable. This report from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child summarizes the complex scientific research on which toxins present the greatest risk at various stages of brain development, addresses popular misconceptions about the relative risk and safety of some common substances, and suggests policies that can help reduce the enormous human and economic costs of exposure to toxins during development.

Read the Report [pdf]

The Parenting Gap

The United States suffers from gaps in income, education and opportunity. The most important gap of all may be in parenting: a gap that harms wellbeing, limits social mobility, and ultimately damages our economy, too. If we want a better society, we need better parents.

It is obvious that parents are huge contributors to the knowledge, skills and character of their children. We can argue about the size of the parenting effect, compared to genetics, economics, culture, schooling, and so on. There is no question, however, that the quality of parenting is one of the most—perhaps the most important contributor to a good, fair, responsible society.

Read more [Brookings Report pdf]

Early Adversity affects Children’s Brains

This edition of the InBrief series outlines basic concepts from the research on the biology of stress which show that major adversity can weaken developing brain architecture and permanently set the body’s stress response system on high alert. Science also shows that providing stable, responsive environments for children in the earliest years of life can prevent or reverse these conditions, with lifelong consequences for learning, behavior, and health. Read more

Early Childhood Adversity and the Role of the Pediatrician

Advances in a wide range of biological, behavioral, and social sciences are expanding our understanding of how early environmental influences (the ecology) and genetic predispositions (the biologic program) affect learning capacities, adaptive behaviors, lifelong physical and mental health, and adult productivity. A supporting technical report from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) presents an integrated ecobiodevelopmental framework to assist in translating these dramatic advances in developmental science into improved health across the life span. Pediatricians are now armed with new information about the adverse effects of toxic stress on brain development, as well as a deeper understanding of the early life origins of many adult diseases. As trusted authorities in child health and development, pediatric providers must now complement the early identification of developmental concerns with a greater focus on those interventions and community investments that reduce external threats to healthy brain growth. To this end, AAP endorses a developing leadership role for the entire pediatric community—one that mobilizes the scientific expertise of both basic and clinical researchers, the family-centered care of the pediatric medical home, and the public influence of AAP and its state chapters—to catalyze fundamental change in early childhood policy and services. AAP is committed to leveraging science to inform the development of innovative strategies to reduce the precipitants of toxic stress in young children and to mitigate their negative effects on the course of development and health across the life span. Read more

A Poverty Solution that Starts with a Hug

NY Times Op-Ed.

PERHAPS the most widespread peril children face isn’t guns, swimming pools or speeding cars. Rather, scientists are suggesting that it may be “toxic stress” early in life, or even before birth.

This month, the American Academy of Pediatrics is issuing a landmark warning that this toxic stress can harm children for life. I’m as skeptical as anyone of headlines from new medical studies (Coffee is good for you! Coffee is bad for you!), but that’s not what this is.

Rather, this is a “policy statement” from the premier association of pediatricians, based on two decades of scientific research. This has revolutionary implications for medicine and for how we can more effectively chip away at poverty and crime.

Toxic stress might arise from parental abuse of alcohol or drugs. It could occur in a home where children are threatened and beaten. It might derive from chronic neglect — a child cries without being cuddled. Affection seems to defuse toxic stress — keep those hugs and lullabies coming! — suggesting that the stress emerges when a child senses persistent threats but no protector.

Vincent Felitti Turning Gold into Lead

The Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study is a major research study that compares current adult health status to childhood experiences decades earlier. With the cooperation of 17,421 adult Health Plan members and with the ongoing collaboration of Dr Robert Anda at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the study is being carried out in the Department of Preventive Medicine at Kaiser Permanente (KP) San Diego—where for many years we conducted detailed biomedical, psychological, and social (biopsychosocial) evaluations of more than 50,000 adult Kaiser Foundation Health Plan members per year.

Dr. Nadine Burkes in the New Yorker

Can a stressful childhood make you a sick adult? [pdf]

A Doctor speaks to ACE Scores as a Vital Sign

For nearly 15 years we’ve had the secret to delivering better care at lower cost in America. The information has sat, hidden away in the medical literature, and barely mentioned among physicians. It’s a remarkable story of bias. The neglect of this information by the medical community tells you a lot about our failings as a profession and the poor training we receive. It’s also a powerful commentary on the values of our society and the biases built into our society’s view of health and healthcare. Read more on philly.com

Newly Born and Withdrawing from Painkillers

BANGOR, Me. — The mother got the call in the middle of the night: her 3-day-old baby was going through opiate withdrawal in a hospital here and had to start taking methadone, a drug best known for treating heroin addiction, to ease his suffering. Read more (NY Times)

Reducing effects of poverty through interventions

Katherine Magnuson’s research focuses on the well-being and development of economically disadvantaged children and their families. In the first half of this brief Magnuson pulls together scholarship on the effects of poverty and inequality on children, especially from infancy to age five. Her scope goes beyond the social sciences to include new findings from neuroscience and developmental psychology that provide a new window into the mechanisms by which disadvantage may have lasting effects on children’s cognition, behavior, and life chances. The second half of the brief looks at what evaluation research suggests as to what works to lessen poverty’s negative influence on children. Magnuson examines two approaches, income support programs and early childhood interventions. Findings suggest that programs that “make work pay” by supplementing the income of low-wage parents of preschool-age children boost student achievement when they enter school. She suggests that the Child Tax Credit and the Supple-mental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) are two other income support programs that could reasonably be considered to have similarly positive effects on children because they too augment families’ economic resources. Several early childhood interventions have also been shown to produce short-term and long-term benefits. Magnuson notes that the evidence supporting the effectiveness of high-quality, center-based early childhood education is strong, concluding that, in times of tight budgets when difficult funding decisions must be made, the research findings summarized in this brief imply that investing in policies and programs aimed at families with young children is a good use of restricted resources. Read the Report [pdf]

Maine’s History, Present and Future

Maine has an extensive and broad history of interest in the impact of stresses, such as Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), on child, family, and adult health and behavior outcomes. There is also tremendous interest in ways to prevent ACEs and the impairment, unhealthy coping, and illness which they may lead to. Report authored by Leslie Forstadt and Mark Rains, 2011.

Maine CDC

2012 State Health Assessment – 167 indicators in 22 topic areas provide an overview of the health status of Maine people. Wherever possible, the data is also presented by county, public health district, sex, age, race, ethnicity, and sexual orientation, and for a limited number of indicators, by income and educational status. Trends for up to ten years are also provided. Some data was updated in 2013, and additional data updates will be added as they become available.

Maine Educational Student Data

Student Enrollment and Demographics

Ideographic of ACEs in Maine

Almost 53% of Maine children have experienced at least one of the following… [2011 pdf]

ACE Survey in Multiple Languages

The ACE Score attributes one point for each category of exposure to child abuse and/or neglect included in the Study. Add up the points for a Score of 0 to 10. The higher the score, the greater the exposure, and therefore the greater the risk of negative consequences.

ACE Survey

One of our goals is to dispel the secrecy and shame associated with ACEs. If you have a history of child abuse, as a victim and/or perpetrator, please take the time to:

Calculate your ACE Score.

Your ACE Score will be calculated using the criteria originally used in the Study. Knowing your ACE Score might make information you read about the Study’s findings more relevant for you.

The ACE Score Calculator will not reflect all forms of abuse, neglect, and trauma that can be experienced during childhood, only those included in the ACE Study. If you have experienced any form of trauma, and you want help, start by talking with a licensed health care provider.

Resilience

What’s Your ACE Score?

There are 10 types of childhood trauma measured in the ACE Study. Five are personal — physical abuse, verbal abuse, sexual abuse, physical neglect, and emotional neglect. Five are related to other family members: a parent who’s an alcoholic, a mother who’s a victim of domestic violence, a family member in jail, a family member diagnosed with a mental illness, and the disappearance of a parent through divorce, death or abandonment. Each type of trauma counts as one. So a person who’s been physically abused, with one alcoholic parent, and a mother who was beaten up has an ACE score of three.

Backpack Connection Series

The Backpack Connection Series was created by TACSEI to provide a way for teachers and parents/caregivers to work together to help young children develop social emotional skills and reduce challenging behavior. Teachers may choose to send a handout home in each child’s backpack when a new strategy or skill is introduced to the class. Each Backpack Connection handout provides information that helps parents stay informed about what their child is learning at school and specific ideas on how to use the strategy or skill at home. This series was developed in collaboration with Pyramid Plus: The Colorado Center for Social Emotional Competence and Inclusion and Bal Swan Children’s Center in Broomfield, Colorado.

Emotional CPR

Emotional CPR (eCPR) is an educational program designed to teach people to assist others through an emotional crisis by three simple steps:

C = Connecting

P = emPowering, and

R = Revitalizing.

The Connecting process of eCPR involves deepening listening skills, practicing presence, and creating a sense of safety for the person experiencing a crisis. The emPowering process helps people better understand how to feel empowered themselves as well as to assist others to feel more hopeful and engaged in life. In the Revitalizing process, people re-engage in relationships with their loved ones or their support system, and they resume or begin routines that support health and wellness which reinforces the person’s sense of mastery and accomplishment, further energizing the healing process

Learning Tools from the Institute for Safe Families

Here are materials developed on child abuse and family violence prevention materials that promote family safety and positive parenting, as well as to raise awareness about how toxic stress and adverse childhood experiences can have a negative effect on children and families. These great materials are now housed with ISF’s programming at the Health Federation of Philadelphia (HFP).

Children’s Emotional Development Is Built into the Architecture of Their Brains

A growing body of scientific evidence demonstrates that emotional development begins early in life and is closely connected with the emergence of cognitive, language, and social skills. Early emotional development lays the foundation for later academic performance, mental health, and the capacity to form successful relationships. Despite this knowledge, most policies related to early childhood focus exclusively on cognitive development as it relates to school readiness, neglecting the importance of such capacities as the ability to regulate one’s own emotions and behavior and to manage successful interactions with other people. As a result, many of our nation’s policies, such as those that regulate child care provider training, availability of early childhood mental health services, and early identification and treatment of behavioral disorders, overlook emotional development as a focus of evaluation and intervention. This report from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child presents an overview of the scientific research on how a child’s capacity to regulate emotions develops in a complex interaction with his or her environment and ongoing cognitive, motor, and social development. It then discusses the implications of this research for policies affecting young children, their caregivers, and service providers.

Harvard University Center on the Developing Child [pdf]

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